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Macromolecular crystallography (MX) is the most powerful technique available to structural biologists to visualize in atomic detail the macromolecular machinery of the cell. Since the emergence of structural genomics initiatives, significant advances have been made in all key steps of the structure determination process. In particular, third-generation synchrotron sources and the application of highly automated approaches to data acquisition and analysis at these facilities have been the major factors in the rate of increase of macromolecular structures determined annually. A plethora of tools are now available to users of synchrotron beamlines to enable rapid and efficient evaluation of samples, collection of the best data, and in favorable cases structure solution in near real time. Here, we provide a short overview of the emerging use of collecting X-ray diffraction data directly from the crystallization experiment. These in situ experiments are now routinely available to users at a number of synchrotron MX beamlines. A practical guide to the use of the method on the MX suite of beamlines at Diamond Light Source is given.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4939-2230-7_13

Type

Journal article

Journal

Methods Mol Biol

Publication Date

2015

Volume

1261

Pages

233 - 253

Keywords

Automation, Laboratory, Crystallography, X-Ray, Macromolecular Substances, Proteomics, Software, Synchrotrons